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Date set: Friday 5th June 2020

 

Today in maths you're going to continue finding fractions of amounts. There are three different levels of challenge, which you can find in the document below. The answers are beneath all of the challenges. I've included an example under each challenge level here. Beneath the work, there is another photo giving two more examples for challenge 2. Good luck!

 

Challenge 1: Finding fractions of amounts where the numerator is 1.

e.g. What is 1/7 of 21?

To find 1/7 of 21, we need to split 21 into 7 equal parts.

So 21 divided by 7 = 3

1/7 of 21 = 3

 

Challenge 2: Finding fractions of amounts where the numerator is greater than 1.

e.g. What is 3/7 of 21?

- Find 1/7 to begin with, by splitting 21 into 7 equal parts.

  21 divided by 7 = 3, so 1/7 of 21 = 3.

- Now, if we know that 1/7 = 3, we know that 3/7 must be three lots of this

  3 x 3 = 9

  So 3/7 of 21 = 9

 

Challenge 3: Finding a fraction more or less than an amount.

e.g. Find 3/7 less than 21

- Find 1/7 to begin with, by splitting 21 into 7 equal parts.

  21 divided by 7 = 3, so 1/7 of 21 = 3.

- Now, if we know that 1/7 = 3, we know that 3/7 must be three lots of this

  3 x 3 = 9

  So 3/7 of 21 = 9

- Finally, we are finding 3/9 less than 21, so subtract 9 from 21

3/7 less than 21 = 12

 

Well done and thank you to Lloyd for spotting two mistakes in the challenge 3 answers! yes I've now corrected these smiley

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Date set: Thursday 4th June 2020

 

Today in maths you're going to be finding fractions of amounts. We're going to be using bar models to help us to understand how to calculate fractions of amounts. Chose one of the three challenges today. You have two sheets to complete in your challenge, and the answers can be found beneath your work.

 

I have uploaded some examples as pictures below which might help you with your work. The first one shows you how to use a bar model to help you to find a fraction of an amount.

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Date set: Wednesday 3rd June 2020

 

Today in maths you're going to continue thinking about equivalent fractions. There are three different challenge levels today below (with answers included).

 

Use yesterday's top tips and examples to support you with this task. I've also uploaded an example below of how to shade in fractions of a shape, to support you with some of the questions.

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Date set: Tuesday 2nd June 2020

 

Today you're going to be having a look at equivalent fractions. These are fractions which are the same size but are expressed (or written) in different ways.

 

Follow this link - watch the videos and read the information. Do not do the activities - I've uploaded your activities for today below! https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zv798xs

 

There are three different challenge levels today (with answers beneath the tasks).

 

Here are some top tips to succeed, and I've also uploaded an example question below.

 

- When given a shape with a fraction of it shaded in, write down the fraction you can see. For example, if two out of five equal sections are shaded in, this = 2/5

- Then think about what you can multiply or divide both the numerator and the denominator by to find equivalent fractions. For example 2/5 can be multiplied by 2 to get 4/10.

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Date set: Friday 22nd May 2020

 

Today you're go have a go at solving The Mystery of The Festival Camping Chaos! You can find the challenge and the answers in the same document below. Solve each clue to find the culprit! 

 

This is quite a long challenge, so if you're not a confident mathematician try the clues which look suitable for you to solve, and narrow down the culprits as much as possible. It doesn't matter if you don't complete it all, it's just a little bit of fun to end the term.

 

Top tips:

For Clue 2, if you're not sure, use your written methods for division (bus stop method) and multiplication. These work exactly the same for decimal numbers!

 

Clue 5 is tricky - only try this if you love a challenge!

 

Good luck!

Date set: Thursday 21st May 2020

 

Today you're going to have a go at a Year 5 reasoning paper. It includes reasoning questions on a range of different subjects. I've attached it with answers below.

 

Challenge 1: Take as long as you need to work through the first twelve questions only.

Challenge 2: Take as long as you need to work through all of the questions.

Challenge 3: Time yourself - see if you can complete all questions in 35 minutes. Don't rush - it's not worth completing the whole paper in time if you're going to make silly mistakes along the way.

Date set: Wednesday 20th May 2020

 

The subject that we are going to be revisiting today is place value. I've attached the assessment and an answer sheet below.

 

Remember, the questions do get trickier the further through the assessment you get, so don't worry if you're finding some of the ones towards the end a little difficult.

 

Top tips:

- For question 2, think carefully about which place value is missing.

e.g. 4562 = 4000 + ___ + 60 + 2

My hundreds are missing, so the gap must be 500

 

- On question 7, when you're finding a number on a scale, remember to calculate what each section of the scale is worth.

Date set: Tuesday 19th May 2020

 

The subject that we are going to be revisiting today is multiplication and division. I've attached the assessment and an answer sheet below. For question four, you don't need to use the method on the sheet. Use long multiplication - and don't forget to place your zero when multiplying by 10!! I've attached reminders of the steps in short multiplication, long multiplication and short division below smiley You can find your challenge beneath these.

 

Remember, the questions do get trickier the further through the assessment you get, so don't worry if you're finding some of the ones towards the end a little difficult.

 

Top tips:

- On question 3, think about using the inverse (the opposite) operation to find Jack's number

- Question number 7 is a tricky one. Think about the cost of eight jackets, and taking this cost away from the total cost. You can then figure out how how much each skirt costs.

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Date set: Monday 18th May 2020

 

This week in maths we are going to revisit some of the areas that we have looked at in Year 5. Today we are going to look at volume.

 

I've attached a little assessment on volume, and an answer sheet, for you to have a go at. The questions do get trickier the further through the assessment you get, so don't worry if you're finding some of the ones towards the end a little difficult smiley

 

Top tips:

 

- Remember, there are 1000 millilitres (ml)  in 1 litre (l).

- To calculate the volume of a cuboid, multiple the height by the width by the length, OR count the number of cubes if you can.

- When counting cubes, remember that shapes are 3D, so there might be cubes that you cannot see but need to be counted. Imagine the shape in your head to help with this.

- On questions 5 and 8, think carefully about which operation to use if you're sharing an amount out equally into smaller amounts... 

Date set: Friday 15th May 2020

 

Today in maths we are going to have a go at some problem solving, using our skills of calculating area and perimeter. There are 3 challenges below to choose from (ignore the colours on these again - they don't match up to the challenge colours that we use!). Answers are on the second page of each document.

 

All of the challenges give you the floor plan of a house, showing you some measurements for each room. Have a go at answering the questions, using the floor plan. Once you've finished, can you write two of your own questions about the floor plan for somebody else to answer?

 

Challenge 1: All the measurements needed for you to calculate area and perimeter are included. 

Challenge 2: Some measurements needed for you to calculate area and perimeter are missing - you will need to figure out the missing measurements yourself before calculating the area/perimeter.

Challenge 3: Some measurements are decimals, and there are rooms within other rooms. Some measurements needed are also missing, so you will need to figure them out yourself!

 

Top tips:

1 - To find the perimeter, add up the length of all sides of the shapes.

2 - To find the area of a rectangle, multiply the height by the width.

Date set: Thursday 14th May 2020

 

Today in maths we are going to revisit a mixture of arithmetic questions. You can choose from one of the three challenges below. I have given a description of the kind of questions in each challenge to help you to decide. You can find the answers at the bottom of the task. (I know that the colours on the sheets don't match up to our green, orange and red challenge colours, so don't worry if the colour seems wrong on your sheet!)

 

Please note that the answer sheet is wrong for Q20 on challenge 2. The answer is 45, not 225.

 

Challenge 1:

- Adding and subtracting five-digit numbers

- Subtracting fractions with the same denominator

- Multiplying two-digit and three-digit numbers by one-digit numbers

- Whole numbers add decimals

 

Challenge 2:

- Adding and subtracting five-digit numbers and four-digit numbers

- Subtracting fractions with the same denominator

- Multiplying two-digit and three-digit numbers by two-digit numbers

- Whole numbers add decimals

- Finding cubed numbers

 

Challenge 3: 

- Adding and subtracting five-digit numbers and two-digit numbers

- Subtracting fractions with the same denominator

- Multiplying two-digit and three-digit numbers by two-digit numbers

- Whole numbers adding and subtracting decimals

- Finding cubed numbers

- Two-digit numbers divided by one-digit numbers

Date set: Wednesday 13th May 2020

 

Today in maths you are going to continue thinking about volume. Once more, you can choose from one of the three challenges below (or work your way through two or more of them). The answers are at the bottom of each document, outlined with a red box.

 

Here are some important things to know/think about for today’s task:

 

  • Read the first two questions on your sheet carefully – it says circle the cuboids. This means you need to circle more than one cuboid, that add together to create the amount in the jug.
     
  • Be careful with units of measurement:
    : When we’re talking about length, we use cm. e.g. A book is 30cm long
    : When we’re talking about area, we use cm². e.g. This area of this book cover is 30cm²

    : When we’re talking about volume, we use cm³. e.g. The volume of this cuboid is 30cm³
     
  • Some of the questions talk about the faces on a cuboid. Remember, faces are the flat 2D surfaces that make up 3D shapes. For example, a cube has 6 square faces.

Date set: Tuesday 12th May 2020

 

Today in maths we are going to begin looking at volume.

 

First of all, follow this link and watch the video. You can have a quick go at the activity too. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zjbg87h/articles/zcrxtyc

 

Then, choose one of the three challenges below. The answers are included (I've put a red box around the answers for each sheet). On these challenges you need to think about the volume of cuboids and the volume of water stored in containers. I would recommend starting on challenge 2, unless you find this topic really tricky, or are really confident​. You can do more than one challenge if you want to start on challenge one and work your way up! smiley

 

Top tips:

 

1 - To calculate the volume of cuboids, count the number of cubes. Remember, in some of the trickier challenges there may be cubes that are out of site. You need to imagine that this is a 3D model, and imagine which cubes you might not be able to see.

 

2 - When finding the volume of liquid in a container, look carefully at the scale. If the container holds 500ml altogether, and the scale is broken down into 5 sections, divide 500ml by 5 to figure out how much each 'section' holds. 500 divided by 5 = 100, so each section must be 100ml.

Date set: Monday 11th May 2020

 

For your last maths task, you looked at calculating the perimeter of shapes. Today, you're going to be looking at the area of shapes. It is important to remember the difference between these: the perimeter is all the way around the outside of the shape, and the area is the size on the inside of the shape, as though you are colouring the shape in.

 

Firstly, I would like you to read the information and watch the videos at this link. You can then complete activity one.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zh9brj6

 

After you've done this, choose one of the challenges that I've attached below to complete.

 

Challenge 1: Calculating the area of rectangles, using times tables

Challenge 2: Calculating the area of rectangles, using long multiplication

Challenge 3: Calculating the area of composite shapes

 

 

Date set: Thursday 7th May 2020

 

Today in maths we are going to revisit the White Rose website to have a look at calculating the perimeter of shapes.

 

Follow the link, and click on Summer Term Week 3 (w/c 4th May). Then find Lesson 4 - Calculate perimeter. Watch the video first and have a go at the task. Look at the challenges below, which tell you which questions to try.

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

 

Challenge 1: Questions 1-3. Then can you draw some of your own shapes for someone to find the perimeter of?

Challenge 2: Questions 1-5.

Challenge 3: All questions!

 

Top tips:

 

1 - Make sure that you add up all sides to find the perimeter! I sometimes cross them off as I add them up to make sure that I don't miss any.

 

2 - On challenge 2, be careful to look for any sides that aren't labelled, that you need to calculate yourself. It's easy to just add up the numbers that you see and not realise that one side is not labelled!

 

Date set: Wednesday 6th May 2020

 

In today's maths, you are going to be thinking about prime numbers and square numbers. We have looked at these before, so before you begin the task see if you can explain what prime numbers and square numbers are to someone at home, giving examples.

 

Afterwards, go to the following website. Read through the information and watch the videos, before completing the two activities at the bottom of the page.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zvv6t39

 

Top tips for prime numbers: 

- Prime numbers are just a memory game - you just need to know them! Knowing your times tables well will help you a lot in identifying them.

- Don't be tricked into thinking all of the lower odd numbers are prime numbers. For example, 9 is divisible by 3, so isn't a prime number.

- 1 is not a prime number, because it can only be divided by itself. 

- 2 is the only even prime number.

 

Top tips for square numbers:

- The square number is what you get after multiplying. The square root is the number that you multiply.

e.g. 4 x 4 = 16

16 is the square number

4 is the square root

 

Good luck!

Date set: Tuesday 5th May 2020

 

Today in maths we are going to be revisiting our bus stop method for division. I've uploaded a challenge below - there are only two challenge levels today which are both in the same document.

 

Challenge 1: Complete the first page of division questions in the document attached below. Then make up 5 of your own division sums to solve. 

Challenge 2: Complete both pages of the document attached below - the second page involves problem solving and reasoning.

 

I've included a success criteria below to help you if needed. Good luck!

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Date set: Monday 4th May 2020

 

Today in maths we are going to be revisiting our column method for multiplication. You can choose from either challenge 1, 2 or 3. I've included a photo example of each challenge below, and you can find the challenges themselves (with answers) beneath these. If you're not sure which challenge to choose, have a look at these photos to help you to decide.

 

Challenge 1: 2 digits x 1 digit

Challenge 2: 2 digits x 2 digits

Challenge 3: 4 digits x 2 digits

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Date set: Friday 1st May2020

 

Today's maths is going to be set on MyMaths. To finish the week we're going to practise something which we looked at in class in the Spring term - rounding decimals.

 

You will be rounding decimals to the nearest whole number and to one decimal place. I've included some tips for doing both below. Remember to watch the video on MyMaths if you find this tricky.

 

Top tips for rounding to the nearest whole number:

 

If I'm rounding 3.4 to the nearest whole number, I'm going to look at the digits after the decimal point, to help me to decide whether to round up or down.

 

Remember, we round up for 5 and above, and down for 4 and below.

 

In 3.4, the number after the decimal is 4, so I must be rounding down.

 

The nearest whole number that I can round down to is 3, so my answer must be 3.

 

Top tips for rounding to one decimal place:

 

Because we're rounding to one decimal place, this time we're going to look at all of the numbers after the first decimal place.

 

e.g. 5.78

 

Here we're looking at the 8. Because it's above 5, we must be rounding up. So I'm going to round up to 5.8.

 

 

Date set: Thursday 30th April 2020

 

Today we’re moving on from adding decimals with a different number of decimal places to subtracting decimals with a different number of decimal places.

 

Exactly the same rules apply as yesterday! To make the subtraction easy, we want both of the numbers to have the same number of decimal places. To do this, we can use our place holding zeros.

 

Go to the White Rose website: https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/ Click on Summer Term - Week 2(w/c 27th April) and you will see Lesson 4 - Subtracting decimals with a different number of decimal places. As usual, watch the video and then try the activity.

 

Top tips:

 

1. Remember your place holding zero to make sure that you have the same number of decimal places in each number.

 

2. Remember to exchange when you cannot subtract in a column properly. For example, in the calculation below, I cannot subtract 5 from 0, so I need to exchange. Then on my next step, I cannot subtract 9 from 6, so I need to exchange again.

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Date set: Wednesday 29th April 2020

 

In today's lesson, you're going to be adding decimals again, but this time, the decimals will have a different number of digits after the decimal point. For example, you might be asked to add the fractions 4.32 and 4.235. We say that these two fractions have a different number of decimal places because they have a different number of digits after the decimal point.

 

Follow this link: https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/. Click on Summer Term - Week 2(w/c 27th April) and you will see Lesson 3 - Adding decimals with a different number of decimal places. As usual, watch the video and then try the activity.

 

Top Tip:

 

Remember your place holding zero!! For example...

 

2.45 + 5.462

 

The first number has two decimal places and the second number has three decimal places. We want the same number of decimal places before we calculate. So we're going to add a place holding zero to the first number.

 

2.450 + 5.462

 

Now both numbers have three decimal places, and I can line them up for my column addition easily.

 

2 . 4 5 0

5 . 4 6 2 +

7 . 9 1 2

     1

Date set: Tuesday 28th April 2020

 

In today's lesson, you'll be using very similar skills to yesterday - you're going to be subtracting decimals with the same number of decimals places. 

 

Follow this link: https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/. Click on Summer Term - Week 2(w/c 27th April) and you will see Lesson 2 - Subtracting decimals with the same number of decimals places. Watch the video then have a go at the activity. Remember to check your answers afterwards.

 

Top tip:

Remember to exchange when you cannot subtract in a column properly. For example, in the calculation below, I cannot subtract 5 from 0, so I need to exchange. Then on my next step, I cannot subtract 9 from 6, so I need to exchange again.

 

 

 

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Date set: Monday 27th April 2020

 

For today's maths lesson, we are going to revisit adding decimals with the same number of decimal places. We did look at this a little last week, but it's good to revisit things to make sure that we are secure, and this involves some problem solving with adding decimals too.

 

Follow this link: https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/. Click on Summer Term - Week 2(w/c 27th April) and you will see Lesson 1 - Adding decimals with the same number of decimals places. Watch the video then have a go at the activity. Remember to check your answers afterwards!

 

Top tips:

 

1 - When using column addition, the decimal points always needs to line up. The helps to line the ones up with the ones, the tens up with the tens, and so forth.

e.g. 1 5 . 6 2               Not    1 5 . 6 2

         4 . 2 3 +                      4 . 2 3    +

 

2 - The perimeter is the distance all the way around the outside of the shape - as though a little person were taking a walk around the edge. Think carefully about how to calculate this.

 

3 - For question 7, think carefully about using place holding zeros to help you to explain your answer. Good luck!

Date set: Friday 24th April 2020

 

Well done on all of your super maths work this week!

 

Today you are going to have a go at adding decimals where the answer will be greater than one.

 

Follow this link: https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/, and find Lesson 4 - Adding decimals - Crossing the whole.

 

Watch the video and then complete the task.

 

Some of the calculations involve decimals with different numbers of digits after the decimal point. For example, question 3b is:

0 . 4 1

0 . 7 _ +

 

Remember to add your place holding zero to make this calculation clear:

 

0 . 4 1

0 . 7 0 +

 

Good luck!

 

Date set: Thursday 23rd April 2020

 

Over the past two days, you've worked on adding and subtracting decimals. Today, you're going to work on 'complements to 1'. Complements to one are just like your number bonds to 10 (1+9, 2+8, 3+7), but instead of using whole numbers to make 10, you're going to be using decimals numbers to make 1.

For example:

0.4 + 0.6 = 1

0.8 + 0.2 = 1

0.51 + 0.49 = 1

 

If you're not sure how to find a complement to one, use subtraction to help you.

For example:

0.63 + ? = 1

1.00

0.63 -

0.37 

 

Go to the link https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/ and this time scroll down to Lesson 3 - Complements to 1. Watch the video, then try the activity. You can mark your work afterwards.

 

After that, have a go at the MyMaths task that I've set on complements to 1.

Wednesday 22nd April 2020

 

Over the past two days, you've worked on adding and subtracting decimals. Today, I've set you a task on MyMaths on using the column method to add and subtract decimals, so that I can see how you're all doing on this. I still haven't heard from some of you/your parents, so make sure to email me by the end of the week at year5@maltese.essex.sch.uk with an update on how you're doing smiley

 

Here are some top tips for using column method to add/subtract decimals:

1) Remember to line up your decimal points. This will help you to line up your tenths, hundredths, etc.

For example, 3.42 + 5.364 =

You would write this in column method as:

3.42

5.364 +

 

2) If you don't have the same number of digits after your decimal point, like in the calculation above, add a place holding zero.

For example,

3.420

5.364 +

8.784

 

3. Remember, when subtracting, you cannot take numbers away from zero - you need to exchange!

For example,

3.40

2.35 -

1.05

In this calculation, 0 subtract 5 cannot be done. So we exchange a 1 from the tens digit (the 4). The 4 then changes to a 3, and the 0 becomes 10. We then have 10 subtract 5 = 5

Tuesday 21st April 2020

 

I hope that you got on okay with yesterday's maths task, and that the video was helpful. For today’s maths task, you will need to follow the same link as yesterday:

 

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

 

Scroll down to where it says ‘Summer Term – Week 1 (w/c 20 April)'. Today you are going to complete Lesson 2. It's similar to yesterday's challenge, but this time you are subtracting decimals, instead of adding them. Watch the video and then get the activity and complete. You can check your answers afterwards.

 

Remember your place value:

The number after the decimal is the tenths number

The number after the tenths number is the hundredths number

For example, 2.45 has 2 ones, 4 tenths and 5 hundredths

 

Don't forget to add a place holding zero when you are calculating with numbers which have a different amount of numbers after the decimal place.

For example, with the calculation 0.4 - 0.23, you need to add a place holding zero after the 0.4, to get 0.40 - 0.23. This should help you to calculate.

 

Good luck! smiley Don't forget to email me at year5@maltese.essex.sch.uk before the end of the week to let me know how you are doing and to share any work​​.

Monday 20th April 2020

 

For today’s maths task, you need to click on the following link:

 

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

 

Scroll down to where it says ‘Summer Term – Week 1 (w/c 20 April)'. Today you are going to complete Lesson 1, which is all about adding decimals under 1. Watch the video and then get the activity and complete. You can check your answers afterwards.

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